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The forgotten ones: Émile Chaumont...

A native of Périgueux, Émile Chaumont (1877-1927) studied lithography and became a master worker at the Ronteix house. Mobilized during the Great War from 1915, he returned from the front, seriously wounded, with the Croix de Guerre.

He joined the Pech printing press in Bordeaux and painted during his free time. He took lessons from Léon Pierre Félix and Albert Laurens and acquired a good reputation. He thus exhibited from 1912 to 1927 at the Salon of French Artists where he was notably awarded an honorable mention.

Émile Chaumont will paint the landscapes of his native Périgord, Corrrèze or the Girondine Landes, using a wide range of bright colors which will be a mark of his style.

Émile Chaumont. Paysage d'été en Périgord - Dordogne. 1912. © Ars Pictura
Émile Chaumont. Paysage d'été en Périgord - Dordogne. 1912. © Ars Pictura

This charming landscape with a well-balanced composition shows a fine mastery of contrasts and colors. The outline of the sky and the quivering of the branches have impressionist accents that an Alfred Sisley would not have disavowed.

Émile Chaumont. Jeune femme à sa lecture © Ars Pictura
Émile Chaumont. Jeune femme à sa lecture © Ars Pictura

Émile Chaumont will also produce many portraits such as that of the young woman reading her in which he develops all his talent as a colorist in the use of acid tones dappled with light.

Georges Laugée. Les premiers pas. 1883. Musée des Beaux-Arts de Carcassonne
Émile Chaumont. Ferme à Sorges © Ars Pictura

The local architecture in its gentle simplicity is a permanent source of inspiration for Émile Chaumont, who takes up in "Ferme à Sorge" the spatial composition of "Paysage en Périgord" by literally making the light vibrate...


The three works presented in this article are present in the catalog of the gallery

24140 Saint-Julien-de-Crempse

06 77 36 95 10

specialist of artists in Périgord.


In his art history lectures, Fabrice Roy combines the past with the present, in a poetic and playful evocation of the French 19th century...




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