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Joaquin Sorolla in the Basque Country

As part of its "The work of a guest" program, the Bilbao Fine Arts Museum presents the works bathed in light by Joaquín Sorolla (Valencia, 1863 – Cercedilla, 1923).

This exhibition joins the celebrations of the centenary of the painter's death with a significant work he painted during one of his first visits to the Basque Country.

"Under the awning, on the beach at Zarautz (1910)" is a key work for understanding the artist's stays in the Basque lands. This painting shows his wife Clotilde and his children María, Elena and Joaquín - dressed elegantly and under the shade of one of the characteristic canopies of the beach in this city of Guipúzcoa.

Joaquin Sorolla. Sous l'auvent. Plage de Zarautz. 1910. Collection du musée Sorolla. Madrid.
Joaquin Sorolla. Sous l'auvent. Plage de Zarautz. 1910. Collection du musée Sorolla. Madrid.

Around 1900, Joaquin Sorolla began painting the beaches of the Spanish Basque country which at the time were popular among royals and aristocrats. He represented scenes of refined leisure with new colors, different from those of the beaches of his hometown, Valencia.

In the summer of 1906, the family moved to Biarritz and San Sebastian and the artist painted beaches and coastal scenes there. In 1910 he moved to Zarautz, where he painted a series of works that revealed his exceptional talent as a portrait painter.

Joaquin Sorolla. Plage de Zarautz. 1910 . Collection du Musée Sorolla. Madrid
Joaquin Sorolla. Plage de Zarautz. 1910 . Collection du Musée Sorolla. Madrid

The northern beaches have become the favorite haunt of the royal family, the aristocracy and the upper middle class. Joaquin Sorolla found many customers there who wanted to see and buy his works.

Joaquin Sorolla peignant sur la plage de Zarautz. 1910. Collection du Musée Sorolla. Madrid
Joaquin Sorolla peignant sur la plage de Zarautz. 1910. Collection du Musée Sorolla. Madrid

Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bilbao

Museo Plaza 2

48009 Bilbao

Biscaya


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