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Delacroix and the arts: a mysterious bridge...

Until September 18, the Eugène Delacroix museum offers a new presentation of its collections by inviting us to cross the "mysterious bridge" that the artist wanted to create between his art and the visitor's gaze.

Curious about everything, Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863) appreciated all forms of artistic expression. A great reader, he often went to the Opera when he was not in Nohan, with George Sand where he liked to listen to Chopin's music. He gladly drew his inspiration from the works of Ovid, Lord Byron or Shakespeare. His paintings then became real stagings with neat decorations and lighting.

Eugène Delacroix. Anacreon et une jeune femme. Fresque. 1834. Musée National Eugène Delacroix Paris © RMN Grand Palais (Musée du Louvre) / Tony Querrec
Eugène Delacroix. Anacreon et une jeune femme. Fresque. 1834. Musée National Eugène Delacroix Paris © RMN Grand Palais (Musée du Louvre) / Tony Querrec

In 1822, Eugène Delacroix wrote in his diary: "A writer must say almost everything to make himself understood, but in painting, it is as if a mysterious bridge were established between the minds of the characters represented and the beholder."

Eduardo Rosales. Sainte Cataline de Sienne reçoit les stigmates.  1862. Musée national du Prado
Eugène Delacroix. Le Cardinal de Richelieu disant la messe dans la chapelle du Palais-Royal. Musée National Eugène Delacroix.

Nestled in rue de Fürstenberg, in the Saint-Germain des Prés district of Paris, the museum is housed in the painter's home. Along the course of the exhibition, you can visit his apartments, but also his studio and a lovely interior garden.

Eugène Delacroix's palette. We will notice the extreme precision of the deposit of the colors. © Fabrice Roy
Eugène Delacroix's palette. We will notice the extreme precision of the deposit of the colors. © Fabrice Roy
National Eugene Delacroix Museum. View of the garden and the studio from the painter's apartment. © Fabrice Roy
National Eugene Delacroix Museum. View of the garden and the studio from the painter's apartment. © Fabrice Roy

The Eugène Delacroix National Museum testifies with emotion and delicacy to the imprint of one of the greatest romantic painters of his time. It seems that the painter himself invites us to share his memories and better understand the springs of his creativity and his mastery of movement and color...


6, rue de Furstenberg

75006 Paris


In his art history lectures, Fabrice Roy combines the past with the present, in a poetic and playful evocation of the French 19th century...




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